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Adam Interviews...Harlowe Frost!

Updated: May 5, 2023


Welcome to the final Monday in April!

Weird.

Fast month, huh?


Today we're talking to Harlowe Frost, a contemporary paranormal romance author. Harlowe Frost has been a teacher at both the high school and college level. Her parents instilled a love of reading from a young age. She grew up in the queer community. Her favorite genre growing up was fantasy and science fiction, that is, until she discovered urban fantasy and paranormal romance. What she never found in those books was the diversity in background, gender identity, and sexuality she saw in the people around her. She decided if she couldn’t find that in what she read, then she would write it herself. This started her writing paranormal romance with a LGBTQ+ background.



Star Trek or Star Wars?

Both, they each have their creative futuristic joy. Star Trek has unique casts with each iteration. Star Wars had more budget from the get go for the special effect.


DCU or MCU?

I’ve seen more MCU. I don’t know if that means I like it more, but it means I’ve consumed more of it.


Reboots – a great idea or a lack of creativity?

Lack of creativity, though some are interesting and fun to watch. I admit, it’s comfortable not having to learn new characters, but, it’s lazy not having to create a new world and characters to build your story.


Where do you get your information or ideas for your books?

I write what I want to read. When I read I always try to predict endings. Well, now my predictions become reality, to some extent. Characters are wily things and do force their own endings a lot of the times.



Is there a trope you find yourself going back to in multiple works? Or one you avoid?

I know I write in tropes, we all do, but I don’t actually think about them as I write. I do try to avoid memory loss. When A character has learned something and I as a reader know it. And then suddenly the character doesn’t know it, it frustrates me. I’ve read some books where it is done well, but many are done horribly.


What was one of the most surprising things you learned in creating your books?

The number of ideas I have and speed at which I can get my idea down. We all know writing a book is hard, and it is, but if I started late in life, and I think I’m okay at this creative outlet.


How many books have you written? Which is your favorite?

Under THIS pen name? Both pen names? All names? So, I’ve probably written about 30 books at this point and I started in 2019. I don’t have a favorite. I will admit, I like what I write. Why write it if I’m not enjoying it. I don’t go out to read my books over and over, but I know that the books aren’t awful. There are some books that I’ve gone back to clean up a couple of years later and I was surprised by some of the bits I’d added. I think one of my favorite series will come out later this year or next and it will be written under this name, Glass Witchling. I’m pretty excited about it.



Do you have any suggestions to help someone become a better writer? If so, what are they?

Find people who will support you. You need good critiquers who know their craft who can help you grow as a writer. Some good writers will put down other authors. Some will help you and your writing flourish. Those are the people you need to find, cherish, and make lots of cookies for.


Do you like to create books for adults?

That is why I’ve created pen names 😊 I wanted to write saucy books.

As a child, what did you want to do when you grew up?

An architect, then an engineer, and finally a math teacher. I’m an excellent math teacher, by the way.



What are common traps for aspiring writers?

Paying for too many critiques and other things. There are a ton of ways other people will “help” you for hundreds if not thousands of dollars. But, until the end, you can find other authors in a similar place to you, and grow your craft together without the large price tag.

Oh, and vanity press. If you are paying to get your book published, do it as a self-published author, no traditional publisher will take any money from you!


What is your writing Kryptonite?

Spelling and grammar, I’m dyslexic. I also have two friends who are editors, so, I’m blessed.



Did you ever consider writing under a pseudonym?

Er… yes… a couple even. I think if I get a third my head may explode.


Do you try more to be original or to deliver to readers what they want?

Original. When Glass Witchling comes out, read it. It will be FANTASTIC!!


Do you think someone could be a writer if they don’t feel emotions strongly?

Yes, emotions are only one piece of writing, and if you have a good writers group, they can help you.


Do you want each book to stand on its own, or are you building a body of work with connections between each book?

My current series, Coastal Wolves, is being written with an overall arc. But each book has it’s own happily ever after. I’m trying to write them so you can pick up any one of them and feel you’ve read a complete story. It’s a fun challenge.



What was the best money you ever spent as a writer?

I’m frugal, so I don’t spend much, but probably Author Ad School. They help with every aspect of publishing your book. They are also lovely people.


What’s your favorite under-appreciated novel?

Wyldling Snare by A.R. Grimes. Excellent writing, world building, and characters. People should be reading it.


Are you traditionally or self published? Or both? Do you feel there are advantages to one over the other?

Both. I haven’t found many advantages to traditionally published books. I’m considering pulling my books and going 100% self-published. Time will only tell.


What does literary success look like to you?

Either my husband or I being able to quit our day jobs. Right now, I am not there.


What do you have coming next?

I’m working on Coastal Wolves. In June, Campus Prowl comes out, July, Pack Triage, then the last two in August and September. Then I’m hoping for Glass Witching, which I ironically wrote years ago. I have all 6 books in that world written.




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